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Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

2 edition of What tobacco farming means to local economies found in the catalog.

What tobacco farming means to local economies

Gale, Fred.

What tobacco farming means to local economies

by Gale, Fred.

  • 244 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, ERS-NASS [distributor in [Washington, DC], Herndon, VA .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States,
  • United states
    • Subjects:
    • Tobacco industry -- United States -- Statistics.,
    • Tobacco farms -- United states -- Statistics.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementFred Gale.
      SeriesAgricultural economic report ;, no. 694
      ContributionsUnited States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economic Research Service.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD1751 .A91854 no. 694, HD9135 .A91854 no. 694
      The Physical Object
      Paginationiv, 21 p. :
      Number of Pages21
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL852070M
      LC Control Number95132456
      OCLC/WorldCa31764108

        The average annual income of tobacco farmers was RMB49,, up by RMB year-on-year. It is estimated that tobacco farmers will increase their non-tobacco income by RMB billion, effectively offsetting the decrease in revenue due to the tobacco reduction plan.   "This means that the Japanese government takes a direct interest in ensuring the success of the tobacco business," says Assunta. agencies that promote trade and economic growth, such as.

        Tobacco opponents frequently rile, huff, and puff at the mere mentioning of the phrase “sustainable tobacco farming”. They claim that it’s not much more than a hypocritical excuse concocted by tobacco merchants to justify the continued cultivation and trading of .   Welcome to the Tobacco Growers Information Portal. Here you will find extensive resources on tobacco production and marketing. The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at North Carolina State University provides extensive educational and research resources to the tobacco farm sector encompassing agronomics, plant pathology, entomology, agricultural engineering, and agricultural economics.

      Items summarized here: Useful Information Concerning Yellow Tobacco, and Other Crops, as Told by Fifty of the Most Successful Farmers of Granville County, N.C., by J.B. Hunter Tobacco, by the Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corp. Crop Book Department; Tobacco has been cultivated and smoked, in various forms and by various procedures, since as early as 6, BCE, when the concept was first developed. Seasonal Tobacco Worker Job Description. When the heat of summer returns each year to the South, so do tobacco plants and the demand for seasonal labor. Despite advances in farming, the task of cultivating and harvesting tobacco remains labor-intensive. And despite advances in workers’ rights, the industry’s laborers.


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What tobacco farming means to local economies by Gale, Fred. Download PDF EPUB FB2

What Tobacco Farming Means to Local Economies /AER Summary Tobacco's contribution to total income in 24 tobacco-growing regions ranges from percent to 15 percent. Its contribution to total employment ranges from to percent.

For most farms, tobacco growing is a part-time, sea. Book Microform: National government publication: Microfiche: EnglishView all editions and formats: Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first. Subjects: Tobacco farms -- Economic aspects -- United States.

Tobacco industry -- Economic aspects -- United States. Tobacco farms -- Economic aspects. View all subjects; More like this. about the tobacco industry and its role in the economy, describes the likely economic impacts of declining. tobacco use, and identifies the most vulnerable farms, workers, businesses, and communities.

The report begins by briefly describing recent trends in. tobacco consumption and production and tobacco’s. The economic impact of progress toward a tobacco-free society: a regional macroeconomic analysis.

Grant no. as submitted to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, NJ. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan School of Public Health, May Author: K. Warner. Growing tobacco also takes advantage of less fertile land that would otherwise be underused.

Most importantly, they argue that tobacco farming generates export earnings, and promotes local economic development in these countries. Inthe five African countries among the top 20 tobacco leaf growers produced overby: In addition to saving millions of lives, tobacco control policies can improve livelihoods and drive enormous economic benefits by preventing the vast economic costs of tobacco-related diseases.

Recent estimates suggest that these costs are close to a staggering two percent of the entire world’s gross domestic product. Although U.S. tobacco production has decreased significantly since the s (from nearlytobacco-growing farms to ab in ), the United States continues to be a leading producer of tobacco leaves.

4 The United States is the fourth largest tobacco-producing country in the world, following China, India, and Brazil. 5 Farms in the United States harvested more than.

At the farm level, tobacco is the dominant cash crop for many tobacco farmers in Africa and India, but in several other large producing countries, tobacco is grown on. Similarly, tobacco control is perceived to represent a threat to farmers whose economic condition is known to be usually precarious, particularly in low- and middle-income countries.

Global economic dynamics have led to a decrease in global prices for tobacco leaves, making the crop less attractive than before and increasing the need of.

Tobacco use is one of the leading preventable causes of death, killing more than 7 million people every year. More than its enormous toll of disease, suffering, and death, tobacco use also burdens the global economy with an estimated US$ trillion in healthcare costs and lost productivity each year.

So why do tobacco farmers grow tobacco. Many farmers report an assured market, even if prices are consistently low. Others report difficulty obtaining credit for other economic activities.

For some, it is a way to generate cash in low-cash economies to pay for necessities like education and health care. Yet, the research demonstrates consistently that many tobacco farmers underestimate their costs and. In fact, only % of jobs in these six states are associated with the core tobacco sectors of the economy.4 Almost half of the tobacco counties in the US derive less than 1% of their income from tobacco farming, and the vast majority of tobacco farmers work off.

The tobacco economy rapidly began to shape the society and development of the colony. Growing tobacco takes its toil on the soil.

Because tobacco drained the soil of its nutrients, only about three successful growing seasons could occur on a plot of land. Then the land had to lie fallow for three years before the soil could be used again.

The economies of a number of poor countries, namely some Asian and African countries, are dependent on tobacco farming. Due to the advent of technologies such as e-cigarettes, and the fact that more people are becoming conscious about the dangers of smoking, cigarette sales are thankfully on the decline, and this spells disaster for tobacco farmers.

The bulk of the world’s tobacco is produced in low- and middle-income countries. In order to dissuade these countries from implementing policies aimed at curbing tobacco consumption (such as increased taxes, health warnings, advertising bans, and smoke-free environments), the tobacco industry claims that tobacco farmers will be negatively affected and that no viable.

Many tobacco farmers lack good alternatives to tobacco, and they have tobacco-specific equipment, buildings, and experience. Most communities will make the transition to a smaller tobacco industry with little difficulty, because tobacco accounts for a small share of the local economy.

Adebiyi, a medical doctor at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, said tobacco farmers should form a co-operative and engage the government for alternative means of sustenance in farming. This means that a farm employing people will have two cases of green tobacco sickness per day, and one person working for days would suffer the effects on two of those days, on average.

This is the main health risk of tobacco farming, but the study did find that using protective clothes and hand-washing markedly reduced the risk. Many of these countries have limited legislative and economic capacities to resist multinational tobacco companies’ influence and investments.

As a consequence of expanded tobacco agriculture, there are short-term economic benefits for some farmers, but there will be long-term social, economic, health and environmental detriments for many.

Government mulls phasing out tobacco ban for local farmers Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, however, rejects that the ban is having as harmful an economic effect. TOBACCO FARMING. Tobacco is a short cycle crop (between 90 and days), intensive and extremely sensitive to the season in which it is planted, grown and harvested.

Tobacco can adapt to a wide variety of soils. However, the most appropriate for its cultivation are those sandy and clay loam.

Blond tobacco requires deeper and better drain than.In the early s, there were increasing calls in the agriculture community for methods of farming that could achieve higher yields with less labor. North Carolina State University, being the agriculture and technology school in the largest tobacco producing state in the country, took the lead in mechanizing the entire tobacco farming process.to be taken, farmers need information on many aspects of the farming business.

Farmers have to find ways of dealing with risk and protecting themselves from the uncertainties of the future. Farmers’ attitudes toward risk Farmers differ in the degree to which they accept risk. Some farmers are willing to accept more risk than others.